September 12, 2018  |  Purdue University Global

One of the wonderful things about earning a bachelor’s degree in business administration is the vast array of career opportunities before you. Unlike other degrees that prepare you to enter one specific occupation, a degree in business administration can offer broad foundational skills, such as communications and decision-making, that are valuable in a variety of careers.

Careers in the business field are growing, too. The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that employment of business and financial operations occupations will grow 10% from 2016 to 2026, faster than the average for all occupations. This will add about 773,800 new jobs to the U.S. economy.

If you’re looking to increase your job opportunities and grow in your career, a business degree may be just what you need. Learn about several career options available to you when you earn a bachelor’s degree in business administration.

Sales Manager

Sales Manager

What they do: Sales managers oversee a company’s sales team. They hire and manage new sales reps, set sales goals, and develop training programs to help staff meet those goals. Sales managers today are increasingly required to analyze data about customers and their buying habits in an effort to capture new leads. They also work closely with the marketing, research, and design departments of the company.

What they work with: Business intelligence and data analysis software, customer relationship management (CRM) software, database software, a suite of office software products such as Microsoft Office or Google Drive.

Five important skills to have: Persuasion, active listening, speaking, coordination, and critical thinking.

You should know: Being a sales manager can be stressful, and it’s likely that some travel will be required.

BLS job growth outlook 2016–2026: 7% (as fast as average).

Administrative Services Manager

Administrative Services Manager

What they do: Administrative services managers coordinate and direct a company’s supportive services. In a small company, one person—usually called the business office manager—may be in charge of all support services. At large companies, there could be several administrative services managers overseeing a variety of departments such as facilities maintenance, recordkeeping, mail distribution, office upkeep, printing and copying, security, and recycling.

What they work with: Accounting software, CRM software, database software, financial analysis software, a suite of office software products such as Microsoft Office or Google Drive.

Five important skills to have: Active listening, reading comprehension, time management, speaking, and coordination.

You should know: If you become a facilities manager, expect to be on call regularly to take care of any problems that occur outside of business hours.

BLS job growth outlook 2016–2026: 10% (faster than average).

Transportation, Storage, and Distribution Managers

Transportation, Storage, and Distribution Managers

What they do: These managers plan, direct, or coordinate transportation or storage activities of a company in accordance with applicable laws, policies, and regulations. Logistics managers—those who plan and direct purchasing, warehousing, and distribution services—fall under this category, too. All three of these roles supervise employees and resolve customer and vendor problems relating to their services.

What they work with: Material requirements planning and supply chain software. In addition, transportation managers will need to know how to use route navigation software; storage and distribution managers will need to know how to use inventory management software; and logistics managers will need to know how to use spreadsheets and database software.

Five important skills to have: Reading comprehension, speaking, active listening, critical thinking, and monitoring.

You should know: The states with the highest employment levels in this field are: California, Texas, Illinois, Ohio, and New Jersey.

BLS job growth outlook 2016–2026: 7% (as fast as average).

Social and Community Service Managers

What they do: Social and community service managers coordinate and supervise social service programs and community organizations. They typically work for nonprofit organizations, private social service companies, or government agencies in a variety of settings, such as clinics, hospitals, shelters, and offices. They usually work with specific populations, such as children, the homeless, veterans, or those with substance abuse disorders or mental health challenges.

What they work with: Database software, a suite of office software products such as Microsoft Office or Google Drive, and, if you work in health care, medical software.

Five important skills to have: Service orientation, social perceptiveness, active learning, active listening, and complex problem solving.

You should know: If you work in this capacity for a smaller organization, prepare to have numerous responsibilities, such as implementing specific programs, speaking at community events, fundraising, and handling administrative tasks.

BLS job growth outlook 2016–2026: 18% (much faster than average).

Other Types of Managers

Other Types of Managers

This category encompasses all other types of managers we haven’t listed separately. Below are several examples.

What they do:

General and operations managers—Those who make policies, manage daily operations, and plan for the use of materials and human resources for a public or private company.

Marketing managers—These managers direct and coordinate the marketing policies and programs for a company, including identifying potential customers, developing pricing strategies, and monitoring trends that indicate the need for new products and services.

Finance managers—Finance managers coordinate and direct the financial activities of a company and its employees, including cost analyses and budget planning.

Human resources managers—Those who coordinate and direct the human resources activities of a company, including helping to resolve work-related disputes, recommending policy changes, administering disciplinary actions, and ensuring compliance with the law.

What they work with: Accounting software, database software, enterprise resource planning (ERP) software, a suite of office software products such as Microsoft Office or Google Drive.

Five important skills to have: Active listening, coordination, monitoring, critical thinking, and speaking.

You should know: The federal government employs a significant number of people in these occupations, more so than any other industry tracked by the BLS.

BLS job growth outlook 2016–2026: 8% (as fast as average) or more, depending on the occupation.

Cost Estimators

Cost Estimators

What they do: Cost estimators use data to estimate the time, money, and materials needed to manufacture a product, construct a building, or provide a service. Depending on the industry, they may work with engineers, architects, contractors, and/or sales teams.

What they work with: Accounting software, analytical or scientific software, database software, financial analysis software, project management software.

Five important skills to have: Mathematics, critical thinking, reading comprehension, active listening, judgment, and decision-making.
You should know: If you become a construction cost estimator, you’ll likely have to make regular trips to construction sites; if you become a manufacturing cost estimator, you’ll probably have to visit factory assembly lines.

BLS job growth outlook 2016–2026: 11% (faster than average).

Management Analysts

Management Analysts

What they do: Management analysts (also known as management consultants) find ways to improve efficiency, reduce costs, and increase revenues at a company. They analyze financial reports, expenditures, and revenue and employment data and use that information to make their recommendations.

What they work with: Database software, development environment software, ERP software, web platform development software.

Five important skills to have: Active listening, critical thinking, reading comprehension, judgment and decision-making, and speaking.

You should know: Most management analysts travel frequently to spend time with clients. The job can be stressful.

BLS job growth outlook 2016–2026: 14% (faster than average).

Earn a Business Administration Degree Online

If you’re looking to expand your job opportunities and grow in your career, earning a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration can help. Purdue University Global offers an online business degree program that enables you to continue working and meeting your family obligations while going to school. Learn more about our online bachelor’s degree in business administration or request more information today.


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Purdue University Global

Purdue University Global delivers a fully personalized, world-class education online that's tailored for adults. We offer 180 programs, including associate's, bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees as well as certificates, in areas such as business, IT, education, health sciences, nursing, criminal justice, and more.


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