Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Concentrations

As a student in the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, you can choose to personalize your education by selecting a concentration, which is a grouping of courses designed to prepare you with specialized knowledge and skills in a specific area of business. Choose from the areas listed below.

Group of professionals working together

Financial Analysis Concentration

As a student in the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a concentration in financial analysis, you will develop skills that are relevant to the opportunity cost of business decisions, and general financial-analysis techniques used in corporations.

  • You will be taught how to apply financial concepts to corporate functions such as financial-statement analysis, cash-flow analysis, debt, and equity combinations to raise capital for funding of business operations. Upon graduation, you’ll be prepared for the workplace with practical skills, including:

    • Understanding corporate funding and investment options
    • Working with financial statements to measure financial performance and make projections
    • Using foreign exchange markets to make financial decisions for corporations

    Real-World Connections

    As part of the financial analysis concentration, you will complete assignments that connect directly to the real world, such as analyzing the current financial statements of major corporations to determine their financial condition and performance. You’ll study how to forecast the future financial performance of major corporations and determine their current value and make recommendations to improve their performance. In addition, you’ll research large global corporations to look for red flags that may warn investors of issues hidden in their financial statements.

    Professional Competencies of Graduates

    • Attention to detail—interpreting data at the transaction level
    • Critical thinking—analyzing, comparing, and interpreting data quickly to solve problems
    • Clear communications at work— interacting with staff, supervisors, and clients
    • High standards of integrity— knowing how to work with sensitive information
    • Computer literacy—creating and analyzing financial documents
    • Evaluate opportunity costs in the business decision-making process.
    • Analyze the effects of changes in demand and supply on market equilibrium.
    • Consider the production decision in profit maximization for the four primary market structures.
    • Examine how macroeconomic indicators are used to gauge economic health.
    • Assess how fiscal and monetary policies affect the U.S. economy.
    • Study the effects of globalization and international trade on the U.S. economy.
    • Analyze financial statements to measure the financial performance of a business entity.
    • Apply time value of money (TVM) concepts to assess decisions involving sets of cash flows.
    • Calculate the cost of debt and equity to determine capital structure policy.
    • Assess investment options based upon cost of capital and expected returns.
    • Compute financial transactions based upon foreign exchange rates.
    • Incorporate the attributes of debt and equity given a cost of capital model.
    • Define the role of financial markets and institutions.
    • Assess debt and equity markets.
    • Evaluate the operations of banks, securities, and insurance companies.
    • Examine the financial performance of a company using financial statements.
    • Assess the principle characteristics of liabilities (debt), equity, and assets.
    • Analyze cash-flow measures for insight into all business activities.
    • Consider the usefulness of return-measures in financial-statement analysis.
    • Project financial statements for an organization, including the income statement, balance sheet, and statement of cash flows.
    • Determine a company’s value by conducting effective earnings forecasts and analyses.
  • According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of financial analysts is projected to grow 11% from 2016 to 2026, faster than average for all occupations.

Human Resources Concentration

This concentration is designed to help you become familiar with the key elements of human resource management in today’s workplace.

  • The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) has acknowledged that the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a concentration in human resources aligns with SHRM’s Human Resource Curriculum Guidebook and Templates. The Human Resource Curriculum Guidebook and Templates were developed by SHRM to define the minimum HR content areas that should be studied by HR students at the undergraduate level.

    As a student, you will develop an understanding of recruiting strategies, training imperatives, employment law, and compensation issues. Earning your Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a concentration in human resources prepares you for the workplace with practical skills, including:

    • Recruiting and hiring the right employees
    • Using technology with training for employees
    • Understanding the laws and regulations regarding employees
    • Developing a compensation strategy
    • Knowing how HR strategic decisions relate to supporting business goals

    Real-World Connections

    The human resources concentration helps you develop HR skills through course assignments and discussions modeled on authentic workplace situations and functions. Assignments include developing an employee-selection plan, building a compensation system, and creating an employee-training plan based on an organization of your choosing.

  • Employment and Staffing

    • Compare diverse employee characteristics and job motivators.
    • Examine employee retention in a competitive marketplace.
    • Analyze the role of compensation and benefits in employee relations.
    • Assess employee recruitment, hiring, and development strategies.

    Employee Training and Development

    • Formulate a strategic training and development process.
    • Explain how personal characteristics and experience influence performance and learning.
    • Analyze traditional vs. new training technology methods.
    • Design the steps involved in employee training and development.
    • Practice globalization as it applies to your field of study.

    Employment Law

    • Evaluate employer liability and remedies with regard to discrimination.
    • Recommend employer steps for federal wage and hour compliance.
    • Develop a response to a Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) request.
    • Prepare a compliance checklist for an Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) on-site visit.
    • Analyze employer rights and responsibilities to employee privacy.
    • Determine the basis for lawful termination of an employee.

    Compensation

    • Discuss why internal alignment is a key policy in compensation.
    • Examine job analysis and design a pay-for-performance plan.
    • Analyze the role of government in the area of compensation.
    • Contrast methods for developing a total compensation strategy.
    • Understand competitiveness and collaboration in a global economy.

    Strategic Human Resource Management

    • Explain a strategic approach to human resources.
    • Examine the elements that support a human resources strategy.
    • Analyze factors that affect human resources.
    • Measure the effectiveness of an organization’s human resources.
    • Explain how strategic HR decisions advance the strategies of an organization.

    Professional Certifications

    Learn more about external certifications associated in this area:

  • According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of human resources specialists is projected to grow 7% from 2016 to 2026. In addition, employment of human resources managers is projected to grow 9% from 2016 to 2026.

Investment Concentration

As a student, you will develop the skills relevant to portfolio management and investment analysis, learning how to assess decision-making approaches and techniques and apply them to financial situations.

  • The investment concentration is designed to expose students to various investment alternatives, such as derivatives and mutual funds, and encourage them to explore risk management techniques necessary to optimize an investment portfolio. Graduates of the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a concentration in investment are prepared for the workplace with practical skills, including:

    • Utilizing asset-allocation models to optimize returns
    • Quantifying risk management techniques
    • Understanding the principles and methods of investing

    Real-World Connections

    As part of the investment concentration, you will complete assignments that connect directly to the workplace. For example, you will construct and manage an investment portfolio of assets, including common stocks, corporate and government bonds, and alternative investments.

    Professional Competencies of Graduates

    • Attention to detail
    • Critical thinking
    • Clear communications at work
    • High standards of integrity
    • Computer literacy
    • Measure investment risk and return.
    • Apply portfolio management techniques.
    • Evaluate the use of alternative investments in a portfolio.
    • Determine optimal portfolio asset allocation.
    • Describe how capital market expectations affect asset returns.
    • Evaluate portfolio performance.
    • Understand theories associated with asset allocation, diversification, and rebalancing.
    • Evaluate mutual funds and allocation of funds.
    • Assess personal and portfolio risk management applications.
    • Analyze asset allocation methods to maximize returns and reduce risk.
    • Understand derivative and risk management definitions and concepts.
    • Explore various risk management techniques and identify risk.
    • Evaluate various derivatives and usage.
    • Develop risk management plans and strategies.
    • Understand regulations and limitations of mitigating risk.
    • Examine the mechanics of buying and selling securities.
    • Calculate the value of stocks, bonds, and derivatives.
    • Critique the utility of market behavior theories.
    • Assess the use of derivatives for speculation and hedging.

Management Concentration

As a student in the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration program with a concentration in management, you’ll be prepared with the knowledge, technical skills, and work habits you need to pursue positions in a variety of business fields.

  • The curriculum is designed to provide you with a solid foundation in management. You’ll learn the basics of effective teamwork and leadership, improve your ability to motivate people and communicate, and develop your decision-making and problem-solving talents. Graduates of this program will be prepared to enter the workplace with practical skills, including:

    • Developing a strategic business plan
    • Working remotely with people through virtual teaming in global environments
    • Understanding organizational behavior and management
    • Creating a continuous improvement environment and culture
    • Developing finance and accounting spreadsheets
    • Utilizing business process management tools
    • Buying and managing inventory
    • Interviewing and validating supplier credentials
    • Developing an original business plan
    • Career engagement through experiential learning

    Real-World Connections

    The Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a concentration in management includes a capstone course in which you must successfully demonstrate your ability to apply the concepts learned to real-world business management scenarios.

    Professional Competencies of Graduates

    Courses within the management concentration could help students develop the following skills:

    • Leadership and communication
    • Problem solving and critical thinking
    • Personal presentation
    • Team management
    • Competitive research and analysis
    • Evaluate information management, planning, and control in business environments.
    • Analyze organizational processes and procedures in a variety of business settings.
    • Synthesize appropriate principles, concepts, and frameworks for making ethical decisions.
    • Assess the roles that structure, management, and leadership play in organizational performance.
    • Evaluate how economics, government, and law affect value creation in the global context.
    • Evaluate career skills in the field of business and management.

    Professional Certifications

    Based on your career path, you may pursue certification in various areas of business.

  • According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of administrative services managers is projected to grow 10% from 2016 to 2026, faster than the average for all occupations.

Marketing Concentration

Marketing is an encompassing concept inherent to all businesses. Marketing is a combination of strategy, behavioral analysis, market research, promotion, distribution, and understanding how to create interest in a product or service.

  • Graduates of this concentration will be prepared with the skills necessary to succeed in such roles as entry-level assignments in numerous marketing positions related to brand management, industrial marketing, marketing research, new product planning, advertising, retail, services marketing, consulting, and others.

    A business degree with a concentration in marketing prepares you to enter the diverse and creative field of product development, market analysis and management, and communications. A concentration in marketing provides an understanding of a product’s marketing mix and the relationship between intermediaries and customers.

    The marketing concentration includes comprehensive classes about core marketing principles, business communications, and the general business landscape. Graduates of the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a concentration in marketing are prepared for the workplace with practical skills, including:

    • Communications
    • Interpersonal skills
    • Organizational skills
    • Creativity
    • Writing skills

    Real-World Connections

    The marketing concentration places emphasis on communication, marketing strategy, and project management skills. Marketing will appeal to students who are creative and want to engage with potential customers. Marketers manage the process of communicating and moving products from producers to consumers.

    Because the work of advertising, promotions, and marketing managers directly affects a firm’s revenue, these professionals typically work closely with top executives. The jobs of advertising, promotions, and marketing managers can be stressful, particularly near deadlines. They may travel to meet with clients or representatives of communications media.

    Professional Competencies of Graduates

    • Leadership and communication
    • Problem solving and critical thinking
    • Personal presentation
    • Understand concepts of multiculturalism and diversity
  • Advertising, Promotion, PR—Integrated Marketing Communication Strategies

    • Explain marketing communication principles and strategies.
    • Distinguish market segments and target audiences.
    • Design a mass advertising campaign strategy.
    • Formulate a public relations plan for an event or cause.
    • Differentiate sales promotion tactics.
    • Create information for a direct marketing plan.

    Consumer Behavior

    • Explain the components of an integrated marketing communications (IMC) strategy.
    • Analyze the consumer decision-making process.
    • Assess promotional techniques.
    • Analyze advertising campaigns.
    • Compare advertising media.
    • Evaluate advertising for compliance with ethical standards.

    International Marketing

    • Discuss strategic, international partnerships.
    • Analyze a foreign market in terms of the cultural, economic/political environment for a product launch.
    • Compare the business ethics in three foreign markets.
    • Assess viability of a foreign product to the U.S. market.

    Marketing Research

    • Formulate a research problem.
    • Determine an appropriate research design to address the problem.
    • Design appropriate data collection methods.
    • Analyze and interpret the data.
    • Prepare a research report.

    Marketing Management

    • Examine how marketing strategies influence marketing decisions.
    • Develop a marketing research plan for a product.
    • Evaluate a firm’s marketing opportunities.
    • Evaluate the marketing mix for a product.
    • Create a customer relationship management plan.
    • Apply marketing mix principles to business or consumer services.
  • The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that employment of advertising, promotions, and marketing managers will grow 10% from 2016 to 2026.

New Media/Internet Marketing Concentration

A business degree with a concentration in new media/internet marketing prepares you with an understanding of what it takes to successfully sell products and services online, and prepares you to manage a firm’s online marketing activities. A business degree with a concentration in new media/internet marketing provides an understanding of business-to-business (B2B) and business-to-consumer (B2C) concepts, customer analysis and relationships, and leadership strategies for successful online marketing and advertising management.

  • Graduates of the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a concentration in new media/internet marketing are prepared for the workplace with practical skills, including:

    • Managing marketing activities in multiple online settings
    • Utilizing social media to promote and sell goods and services
    • Utilizing online tools to analyze markets, enhance the image of the firm, and fully optimize a firm’s web-based marketing operations

    Real-World Connections

    Social networking and internet marketing have become key components of the marketing foundation of many organizations. Today, employees in this area are valued as key members of a firm’s staff.

    Professional Competencies of Graduates

    • Leadership and communication
    • Interpersonal skills, personal presentation
    • Teamwork
    • Creativity and imagination
    • Organizational skills
    • Problem solving and critical thinking
    • Understand concepts of multiculturalism and diversity
    • Basic marketing concepts, including marketing mix, consumer behavior, marketing strategy
    • Marketing management, including evaluating marketing opportunities and developing marketing programs
    • Advertising concepts, including integrated marketing strategy, promotional techniques, comparing advertising media, and ethical standards
    • Online concepts and techniques including social media and web-related marketing activities
  • Digital Marketing

    • Investigate the rapid growth of eMarketing over business sectors.
    • Describe key terms associated with eMarketing.
    • Develop an eMarketing strategy for a global environment.
    • Reflect upon the cyber security and ethical issues associated with eMarketing.

    Social Media Marketing

    • Investigate the rapid growth of social network marketing in the global environment.
    • Identify key social network websites and their specific target markets.
    • Apply the concepts of social network marketing in the development of B2B and B2C in a social network marketing strategy in a global environment.
    • Understand the cyber security and ethical issues specific to social network marketing.
    • Develop a personal brand utilizing social media.

    Advertising, Promotion, PR—Integrated Marketing Communication Strategies

    • Explain the components of an integrated marketing communications (IMC) strategy.
    • Analyze the consumer decision making process.
    • Assess promotional techniques.
    • Analyze advertising campaigns.
    • Compare advertising media.
    • Evaluate advertising for compliance with ethical standards.

    Marketing Management

    • Examine how marketing strategies influence marketing decisions.
    • Develop a marketing research plan for a product.
    • Evaluate a firm’s marketing opportunities.
    • Evaluate the marketing mix for a product.
    • Create a customer relationship management plan.
    • Apply marketing mix principles to business or consumer services.
  • According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of market research analysts is projected to grow 23% from 2016 to 2026—much faster than average for all occupations.

Procurement Concentration

The procurement concentration focuses on practical skills that can be applied immediately to the workplace. You'll study negotiating and monitoring agreements and contracts, and how to analyze financial reports to determine the best source of supplies.

  • As a graduate of the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a concentration in procurement, you’ll be prepared for the workplace with practical skills, including:

    • Negotiating and monitoring agreements and contracts
    • Working remotely with people
    • Analyzing proposals, financial reports, and other information to determine the best source of supplies
    • Evaluating suppliers based on price, quality, and delivery speed

    Real-World Connections

    Although educational requirements for buyers and purchasing agents may vary by the size of the organization and the type of product, all need extensive on-the-job training. To pursue a purchasing manager position, you may need a bachelor’s degree in addition to experience working as a buyer or purchasing agent.

    Professional Competencies of Graduates

    • Leadership and communication
    • Problem solving and critical thinking
    • Personal presentation
    • Appreciation of multiculturalism and diversity
  • Management of Information Systems

    • Gain an understanding of the role of computer-based information systems in business organizations.
    • Emphasize management and the technical concepts essential to business application and management control of information systems.
    • Focus on the use of information systems to solve business problems and gain a competitive advantage.
    • Examine the planning, procedures, and controls used to secure and mitigate risks to information systems.

    Operations Management

    • Focus on the importance of the operations function in organizations.
    • Examine the fundamental issues of facilities location, output planning, inventory control, scheduling, and quality control.
    • Emphasize quality and its impact in securing a strategic advantage for manufacturing and service entities.

    Quality Management

    • Explore methods of analyzing and evaluating total quality management (TQM) principles and continuous quality improvement (CQI) processes in organizations.
    • Compare appropriate total-quality tools and performance measures.
    • Examine leadership and teamwork in the business environment.

    Financial-Statement Analysis

    • Analyze and utilize financial statements and valuation models to assess the value of a firm.
    • Focus on four key components: financial ratio and cash flow; accounting analysis and valuation; business strategy and valuation analysis; and forecasting and risk analysis.

    Professional Certification Information Websites

    Learn more about external certifications associated in this area:

Project Management Concentration

A project is a unique, temporary endeavor, undertaken to achieve specific objectives, and conducted through processes defined in terms of inputs, techniques, and outputs.

  • Project management is the application of knowledge, skills, tools, and techniques to project activities to meet the project’s requirements.

    The Project Management Institute's A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide) identifies the following five process groups that recur in the project management field: initiating, planning, executing, monitoring and controlling, and closing. The guide also recognizes ten project management areas: integration, scope, time, cost, quality, human resources, communications, risk, procurement, and stakeholder.*

    *Project Management Institute (PMI). (2017). A guide to project management body of knowledge (PMBOK® Guide) (6th ed.). Newtown Square, PA: Project Management Institute (PMI).

    Real-World Connections

    Project management is shaped by the goals, resources, and schedule of each project. Many organizations are now utilizing the management of projects as both a training ground for potential executives and a testing ground to determine executive competencies.

    Professional Competencies of Graduates

    Courses within the project management concentration could help students develop the following skills:

    • Leadership and communication
    • Problem solving and critical thinking
    • Personal presentation
    • Understanding concepts of multiculturalism and diversity
    • Identify relationships between process groups and knowledge management areas.
    • Create artifacts to effectively establish project management triple constraints.
    • Generate artifacts to plan and manage project risk and resources.
    • Produce artifacts to effectively manage and control project execution.
    • Explain why ethics and integrity are important to the field of information technology (IT).
    • Practice global interconnectedness as it applies to your field of study.
    • Plan project resources.
    • Examine the project management knowledge areas.
    • Assess project work.
    • Demonstrate the ability to manage project teams.
    • Assess the role of a business process within a strategic structure.
    • Analyze the role of planning and metrics in a successful business project management (BPM) project.
    • Examine methods of innovation and the role of people management in BPM.
    • Study how BPM can increase competitiveness and collaboration.
    • Evaluate methods to implement and deliver benefits from a BPM project.
    • Review methods to sustain benefits from a BPM project.
    • Explain the impact of total quality management (TQM) principles on organizations.
    • Compare appropriate TQM tools and performance measures used in management.
    • Propose leadership and teamwork strategies in business organizations.
    • Assess how TQM strategies impact service delivery.

    Professional Certifications

    Learn more about external certifications associated in this career area:

  • According to an article by PMI, employers will need to fill nearly 22 million new project-oriented roles on an annualized basis through 2027. As the need for project managers expands, so must practitioners’ skills and knowledge of global standards.

Real Estate Concentration

As a student in the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a concentration in real estate, you will develop the skills relevant to real estate sales and the real estate industry as they apply to a wide range of financial situations.

  • You will learn to apply concepts and ideas directly related to the national real estate licensing examination.

    Graduates of the program are prepared for the workplace with practical skills, including:

    • Negotiating real estate agreements and contracts
    • Executing fiduciary responsibilities of a real estate agent to brokers, clients, and the general public
    • Performing the duties of a property manager
    • Understanding the types of loans used to finance real estate
    • Recognizing state and federal law designed to protect the public in real estate transactions
    • Understanding the role of construction and development
    • Comprehending legal and ethical issues in the real estate field

    Real-World Connections

    The real estate concentration helps you develop the skills relevant to a career in real estate and its many related areas. You will learn about the responsibilities and duties of an agent in both commercial and residential sales and property management, as well as studying the issues of real estate development and finance. You will also be introduced to concepts and ideas directly related to the national real estate licensing examination.

    Professional Competencies of Graduates

    Courses within the real estate concentration could help students develop the following skills:

    • Attention to detail—interpreting data at the transaction level
    • Critical thinking—analyzing, comparing, and interpreting data quickly to solve problems
    • Clear communications at work— interacting with staff, supervisors, and clients
    • High standards of integrity—knowing how to work with sensitive information
    • Computer literacy—creating and analyzing financial documents
    • Explain property ownership rights.
    • Determine real estate values in a selected market.
    • Analyze the legal and ethical considerations in a real estate transaction.
    • Summarize the real estate sales process and compliance issues.
    • Apply ethical rules governing the field of study.
    • Diagram how money flows in the real estate credit market.
    • Evaluate the legal and ethical concerns in a real estate transaction.
    • Summarize the closing costs for a real estate sales scenario.
    • Solve real-world problems using mathematical skills.
    • Evaluate an entity’s legal rights to real estate.
    • Recommend the appropriate contract for a given real estate scenario.
    • Explain the legal commitments associated with agency relationships.
    • Analyze the laws and regulations pertinent to the real estate profession.
    • Use principles of sound reasoning within the field of study.
    • Analyze the buying and selling functions from both the client and customer perspective.
    • Evaluate the process of opening and closing sales by reviewing real life case studies.
    • Conduct a negotiation in a simulated setting.
    • Evaluate the key concepts of customer relationships by applying them to various scenarios.
    • Evaluate the key differences between international and domestic sales strategies.
    • Discover the ethical and legal issues associated with the selling process.
    • Analyze patterns of behavior through direct human interaction.

    Professional Certifications

    Certification for real estate professionals varies by state. To find the requirements in your area, contact your state’s real estate division. This program is not intended to lead to certification as a real estate professional. Certification may require additional education and passing an exam; requirements vary by state. To find the requirements in your area, contact your state’s real estate division.

Sales Management Concentration

A business degree with a concentration in sales management prepares you with an understanding of what it takes to successfully sell products and services, and prepares you to manage a salesforce. A business degree with a concentration in sales management provides an understanding of business-to-business (B2B) and business-to-consumer (B2C) selling concepts, customer analysis and relationships, and leadership strategies for successful salesforce management. The sales management concentration includes comprehensive classes about sales functions, recruitment, selection, and retention planning for sales personnel as part of a business plan.

  • Graduates of the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a concentration in sales management are prepared for the workplace with practical skills, including:

    • Conducting negotiations in multiple settings
    • Evaluation of recruitment, selection, and retention planning for sales staff
    • Evaluation of the consumer decision-making process

    Real-World Connections

    Sales management requires knowledge of consumer behavior, forecasting and budgeting, salesforce development, and leadership. A concentration in sales management will appeal to students who are socially oriented and want to set the tone for sales of an organization. A sales manager’s efforts go beyond the customer and help lead a company through relationships with employees, partners, investors, and suppliers.

    Professional Competencies of Graduates

    • Leadership and communication
    • Interpersonal skills, personal presentation
    • Teamwork
    • Creativity and imagination
    • Organizational skills
    • Problem solving and critical thinking
    • Understand concepts of multiculturalism and diversity
  • Professional Selling

    • Analyze the buying and selling functions from both the client and customer perspective.
    • Evaluate the process of opening and closing sales by reviewing real-life case studies.
    • Conduct a negotiation in a simulated setting.
    • Evaluate the key concepts of customer relationships by applying them to various scenarios.
    • Evaluate the key differences between international and domestic sales strategies.
    • Discover the ethical and legal issues associated with the selling process.

    Marketing Research

    • Formulate a research problem.
    • Determine an appropriate research design to address the problem.
    • Design an appropriate data collection method.
    • Recommend a business solution based on data analysis and interpretation.
    • Prepare a research report.
    • Understand competitiveness and collaboration in a global economy.

    Salesforce Management

    • Classify different sales functions.
    • Evaluate recruitment, selection, and retention plans for salespeople.
    • Design sales plans.
    • Create sales presentations.
    • Evaluate sales management and leadership strategies.
    • Manage a salesforce.

    Consumer Behavior

    • Explain the components of an integrated marketing communications (IMC) strategy.
    • Analyze the consumer decision-making process.
    • Assess promotional techniques.
    • Analyze advertising campaigns.
    • Compare advertising media.
    • Evaluate advertising for compliance with ethical standards.

    Professional Certifications

    Learn more about external certifications associated in this area:

  • According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of sales managers is projected to grow 7% from 2016 to 2026. Employment growth of these managers will depend primarily on growth or contraction in the industries that employ them.

Supply Chain Management and Logistics Concentration

SAP University Alliances logo

This concentration is designed to expose students to the key processes of supply chain management and logistics covering the planning and management of all activities involved in sourcing, conversion, and logistics management as well as the information systems supporting these areas.

Purdue Global is a member of the SAP University Alliances program.

  • Students will develop an understanding of the procurement, maintenance, and transportation of materials, facilities, and personnel, and apply quantitative and qualitative methodologies used in global supply chain management.

    Graduates of the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a concentration in supply chain management and logistics are prepared for the workplace with practical skills, including:

    • Negotiating agreements and contracts
    • Working remotely with people
    • Buying and managing inventory
    • Interviewing and validating supplier credentials

    Real-World Connections

    As part of the supply chain management and logistics concentration, students complete assignments that connect directly to their workplace. For example, they must interview various supply chain professionals within their organization or local communities to identify supplier selection and management strategies and evaluate these based on what they learn.

    Professional Competencies of Graduates

    • Leadership and communication
    • Problem solving and critical thinking
    • Personal presentation
    • Understand concepts of multiculturalism and diversity
  • Global Supply Chain Management

    • Discuss the significance of supply chain management in a global organization.
    • Evaluate supply issues in supply chain management.
    • Evaluate operational issues in supply chain management.
    • Analyze the impact of distribution in supply chain effectiveness.
    • Analyze the role of customers and locations for effective supply chain networks.
    • Analyze the performance of the supply chain network.

    Logistics and Distribution Management

    • Examine how to align logistics with business strategy.
    • Recommend how logistics can be coordinated to ensure customer value.
    • Evaluate methods to measure and manage logistics performance.
    • Recognize the role of distribution within the global pipeline.
    • Examine how risk management helps mitigate distribution and supply chain problems.
    • Recognize information flow and decision making in the distribution network.

    Operations Management

    • Examine the business concepts of quality management and lean systems.
    • Create a product design and a service design within an operations management environment.
    • Compare human resource and project management principles to operation management.
    • Examine supply chain management and global supply chain concepts.
    • Evaluate the purpose of forecasting and inventory management.
    • Create a facility design within an operations management environment.

    Purchasing and Vendor Management

    • Discuss the role and mechanisms of the purchasing function in an organization.
    • Evaluate the strategic impact and significance of the purchasing function.
    • Analyze methods for developing a global network.
    • Apply analytical methods to increase purchasing effectiveness.
    • Discuss the mechanisms of establishing formal relationships with vendors.
    • Evaluate supply chain connectivity and effectiveness.

    Strategic Warehouse Management

    • Recognize the impact of inventory on warehouse management.
    • Analyze physical flows and transportation options that support warehouse operations.
    • Evaluate the role of warehouse management within the global supply chain.
    • Apply package and handling concepts within a warehouse management environment.
    • Examine how operations analysis provides tools for overcoming issues and challenges.
    • Apply risk management and sustainability concepts to warehouse management.

    Quality Management

    • Explain the impact of total quality management (TQM) principles on organizations.
    • Compare appropriate TQM tools and performance measures used in management.
    • Propose leadership and teamwork strategies in business organizations.
    • Assess how TQM strategies impact service delivery.

    Professional Certifications

    Learn more about external certifications associated in this area:

  • The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that employment of logisticians is projected to increase 7% from 2016 to 2026.

Wealth Management Concentration

This concentration is designed to help you develop the skills relevant to wealth management, portfolio management, and financial planning, and apply concepts related to wealth management and portfolio management as they relate to the financial industry.

  • You will explore the risk management concepts of a healthy investment portfolio.

    Graduates of the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a concentration in wealth management are prepared for the workplace with practical skills, including:

    • Determining client needs and life situations and applying financial planning techniques and strategies to find solutions
    • Identifying and treating loss exposure faced by individuals and organizations
    • Understanding the theory and practice of concepts such as prospecting and probing
    • Handling negotiations, presenting and closing sales, and building relationships
    • Understanding and analyzing investment and financial decisions in corporations
    • Knowing the principles and methods of investing in equity, fixed-income instruments, and derivatives

    Real-World Connections

    As part of the wealth management concentration, you will complete assignments that connect directly to the workplace. For example, you will identify individual client needs and apply financial planning techniques to address these issues.

    Professional Competencies of Graduates

    • Attention to detail
    • Critical thinking
    • Clear communications at work
    • High standards of integrity
    • Computer literacy
    • Define key terms and concepts used in personal financial planning.
    • Identify the needs and objectives of a client.
    • Evaluate products and services available to meet client objectives.
    • Recommend financial products and/or services for clients in various life stages.
    • Revise a financial plan based on changes in client objectives or market conditions.
    • Propose a mutually beneficial solution in a business negotiation.
    • Assess the various types of insurance risks in our society.
    • Evaluate commercial and personal risk management applications.
    • Analyze the insurance industry, insurance regulations, and insurer operations.
    • Understand buying and selling functions from the client or customer perspective.
    • Know the process of opening and closing sales by reviewing actual case studies.
    • Conduct a negotiation in a simulated setting.
    • Analyze financial statements to measure the financial performance of a business.
    • Apply time value of money (TVM) concepts to assess business decisions involving sets of cash flows.
    • Calculate the cost of debt and equity to determine capital structure policy.
    • Assess investment options based upon cost of capital and expected returns.
    • Compute financial transactions based upon foreign exchange rates.
    • Incorporate the combined attributes of debt and equity with a cost of capital model.
    • Examine the mechanics of buying and selling securities.
    • Calculate the value of stocks, bonds, and derivatives.
    • Critique the utility of market behavior theories.
    • Assess the use of derivatives for speculation and hedging.
  • According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of financial managers is projected to grow 19% from 2016 to 2026, much faster than the average for all occupations.

NOTES AND CONDITIONS

Purdue Global cannot guarantee employment or career advancement. Certain investment and wealth management positions may require securities licensing and successful completion of a securities exam. This program is not intended to lead to certification as a real estate professional and was not designed to meet any specific state’s requirements for licensure or certification in any field. Purdue Global makes no representations or warranties as to whether the degree or any individual courses meet such requirements.

Students are responsible for understanding the requirements of optional certification exams. The University cannot guarantee students will be eligible to sit for or pass exams. In some cases, work experience, additional coursework beyond the Purdue Global program, fieldwork, and/or background checks may be necessary to be eligible to take or to successfully pass the exams. Refer to the University Catalog and the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) for additional information.

National long-term projections may not reflect local and/or short-term economic or job conditions, and do not guarantee actual job growth.