Bachelor of Science in Accounting Concentrations

As a student in Purdue Global’s Bachelor of Science in Accounting, you can customize your degree plan by focusing on a concentration best suited to your professional goals. Gain an in-depth understanding of the four concentrations available.

Two profesionals speaking

Auditing/Forensic Accountancy Concentration

Many aspects of a company require auditing, including financial audits, tax audits, operational-efficiency audits, internal-control audits, forensic or fraud audits, and regulatory compliance audits.

  • Public corporations are required by law to maintain an internal audit committee led by an outside director. This requirement results in a continuous auditing process involving a team who are responsible for reporting on the effectiveness of the internal control process, evaluating risk management, and furthering the governance process.

    As a graduate of the Bachelor of Science in Accounting with a concentration in auditing/forensic accountancy, you’ll be prepared for the workplace with:

    • Interpersonal communication skills
    • Teamwork skills
    • Professional skepticism
    • Ability to apply commercial law to business transactions
    • Capacity to apply accounting principles to complex transactions

    Real-World Connections

    The auditing/forensic accountancy concentration curriculum introduces you to the basics of the financial audit, from the engagement letter, through the audit steps, to the exit interview and audit report. Courses focus on the financial audit process in a wide range of business cycles. You will evaluate management assertions as they apply to recognition, measurement, presentation, and disclosure of financial information.

    Professional Competencies of Graduates

    Courses within the auditing/forensic accountancy concentration could help you develop the following skills:

    • Attention to detail
    • Problem solving and critical thinking
    • Clear communications at work
    • Ethical standards
    • Computer literacy
  • Intermediate Accounting III

    • Analyze methods used for revenue recognition.
    • Examine methods of accounting for income taxes including deferred taxes and net operating losses.
    • Differentiate accounting for pension funds and pension plans.
    • Analyze different types of lease transactions.
    • Examine methods to account for accounting errors and changes.
    • Analyze financial reporting disclosure requirements.

    Auditing

    • Determine the auditor’s responsibilities for adherence to professional, ethical, and legal standards.
    • Assess risk and audit evidence.
    • Determine internal controls to prevent and detect fraud.
    • Evaluate risks, internal control, and appropriate audit tests for asset, liability, and equity accounts.
    • Recommend appropriate audit reports for a completed audit.
    • Determine appropriate use of non-audit assurance or attestation services.

    Advanced Accounting

    • Apply the equity method of accounting for corporate investments.
    • Prepare worksheet consolidation entries for financial statements.
    • Determine the proper accounting for controlling and non-controlling interests in business combinations.
    • Assess the impact of variable interest entities, ownership patterns, and segment reporting.
    • Determine foreign currency business transactions and the translation of international corporate financial statements.
    • Evaluate accounting concepts for government and nonprofits.

    Advanced Forensic Accounting

    • Differentiate forensic accounting and fraud examination.
    • Examine fraud in accounting.
    • Determine how computers are used in cybercrime.
    • Create legal support for accusations of fraud in accounting.
    • Use forensic accounting techniques to determine asset misappropriation and assess financial statement fraud.
  • According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of accountants and auditors is projected to grow 10% from 2016 to 2026, which is faster than average for all occupations.

Managerial Accountancy Concentration

To succeed in today’s competitive global marketplace, businesses must determine the best ways to maintain high quality products while keeping costs and prices low.

  • The managerial accountant profession focuses on this value chain, utilizing tools such as just-in-time (JIT) inventory management systems, total-quality management, activity-based costing, and applying the theory of constraints to manage bottlenecks.

    As a graduate of the Bachelor of Science in Accounting with a concentration in managerial accountancy, you will be prepared for the workplace with:

    • Problem-solving skills
    • Analytical skills
    • Communication skills
    • Understanding of risk analysis
    • Knowledge of capital budgeting
    • Understanding of variance analysis

    Real-World Connections

    The primary focus of managerial accounting is providing information to various levels of management and departments. Capital budgeting and cost controlling are major functions of the managerial accountant. The managerial accountancy concentration provides you with exposure to the budget process and variance analysis. Courses focus on developing costs in both a manufacturing environment as well as within a company that provides services.

    Professional Competencies of Graduates

    Courses within the managerial accountancy concentration could help you develop the following skills:

    • Attention to detail
    • Critical thinking
    • Clear communications at work
    • Business ethics
    • Capital budgeting
    • Working in teams
  • Intermediate Accounting III

    • Analyze methods used for revenue recognition.
    • Examine methods of accounting for income taxes including deferred taxes and net operating losses.
    • Differentiate accounting for pension funds and pension plans.
    • Analyze different types of lease transactions.
    • Examine methods to account for accounting errors and changes.
    • Analyze financial reporting disclosure requirements.

    Auditing

    • Determine the auditor’s responsibilities for adherence to professional, ethical, and legal standards.
    • Assess risk and audit evidence.
    • Determine internal controls to prevent and detect fraud.
    • Evaluate risks, internal control, and appropriate audit tests for asset, liability, and equity accounts.
    • Recommend appropriate audit reports for a completed audit.
    • Determine appropriate use of non-audit assurance or attestation services.

    Cost Accounting

    • Determine factors that influence the design of a cost management system.
    • Determine how overhead costs are allocated to products and services.
    • Illustrate job order costing and process costing systems.
    • Explain the allocation of joint costs to products in a joint process.
    • Develop standard cost steps to perform variance analysis.
    • Apply costing concepts to budgetary planning and cost-volume-profit analysis.

    Financial-Statement Analysis

    • Examine the financial performance of a company using its financial statements.
    • Assess the principle characteristics of liabilities (debt), equity, and assets.
    • Analyze cash flow measures for insight into all business activities.
    • Examine the usefulness of return measures in financial-statement analysis.
    • Project financial statements, including the income statement, balance sheet, and statement of cash flows, for an organization.
    • Determine the value of a company with effective earnings, forecasts, and analyses.
  • The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that employment of cost estimators will grow 11% from 2016 to 2026, which is faster than average for all occupations.

Public Accountancy Concentration

Public accountants offer a broad range of services, including tax preparation, accounting and bookkeeping, auditing, consulting, budgeting, and forecasting. Their clients may include individuals, corporations, partnerships, proprietorships, and not-for-profit organizations.

  • Corporate scandals and the financial crisis of 2008 have placed new emphasis on the importance of scrupulous accounting. Congressional passage of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 limited the services that an accounting firm can offer to their clients, sparking new opportunities for specialization.

    As a graduate of the Bachelor of Science in Accounting with a concentration in public accountancy, you will be prepared for the workplace with:

    • Interpersonal skills
    • Problem-solving and critical-thinking skills
    • Written and oral-communication skills
    • Organizational skills
    • Analytical skills
    • Ability to apply law to business and consumer transactions
    • Capacity to apply accounting principles to complex transactions

    Real-World Connections

    As part of the public accountancy concentration, you will be introduced to taxation, financial accounting, managerial and cost accounting, as well as auditing and mergers and acquisitions. Business law courses examine commercial transactions, contracts, and the Uniform Commercial Code. Auditing and forensic accounting courses introduce you to the requirements of an audit and the steps needed to offer clients assurance at the conclusion of an audit engagement.

    Professional Competencies of Graduates

    Courses within the public accountancy concentration could help you develop the following skills:

    • Attention to detail
    • Critical thinking
    • Clear communications at work
    • Ethical standards
    • Computer literacy
    • Leadership
  • Intermediate Accounting III

    • Analyze methods used for revenue recognition.
    • Examine methods of accounting for income taxes including deferred taxes and net operating losses.
    • Differentiate accounting for pension funds and pension plans.
    • Analyze different types of lease transactions.
    • Examine methods to account for accounting errors and changes.
    • Analyze financial reporting disclosure requirements.

    Auditing

    • Determine the auditor’s responsibilities for adherence to professional, ethical, and legal standards.
    • Assess risk and audit evidence.
    • Determine internal controls to prevent and detect fraud.
    • Evaluate risks, internal control, and appropriate audit tests for asset, liability, and equity accounts.
    • Recommend appropriate audit reports for a completed audit.
    • Determine appropriate use of non-audit assurance or attestation services.

    Advanced Tax–Corporate

    • Examine the tax components and unique rules applicable to corporations.
    • Describe the corporate tax reporting process.
    • Analyze the tax treatment of business profits and distributions.
    • Prepare a C corporation and an S corporation income tax return.
    • Compare the allowed business entities and their related tax attributes.
    • Explain the IRS administrative powers and allowed taxpayer responses.

    Advanced Forensic Accounting

    • Differentiate forensic accounting and fraud examination.
    • Examine fraud in accounting.
    • Determine how computers are used in cybercrime.
    • Create legal support for accusations of fraud in accounting.
    • Determine asset misappropriation using forensic accounting techniques.
    • Assess financial statement fraud using forensic accounting techniques.
  • According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of budget analysts is projected to grow 7% from 2016 to 2026.

Tax Accountancy Concentration

Today’s tax accountants do much more than file tax returns—they handle tax planning for individuals, corporations, and business entities. Tax laws are constantly changing and professionals must continue to learn and grow.

  • A willingness to work hard and to learn and stay relevant provides a tax career path with variety and the potential for upward mobility. Tax laws established by congress are separate from (and at times in conflict with) generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP). Tax accountants in global financial markets must not only be familiar with the U.S. Internal Revenue Code (IRC), but the effects of foreign tax codes on multinational business units as well.

    As a graduate of the Bachelor of Science in Accounting with a concentration in tax accountancy, you’ll be prepared for the workplace with:

    • Analytical skills
    • Problem-solving skills
    • Communication skills
    • Strategic thinking
    • Interpersonal skills

    Real-World Connections

    As part of the tax accountancy concentration, you will be introduced to auditing and the impact that an audit may have on current and past taxable income. Mergers and acquisitions are also an important part of the tax curriculum. Understanding taxation’s impact on net income and the tax consequences of a business combination are paramount in today’s business environment.

    Professional Competencies of Graduates

    Courses within the tax accountancy concentration could help you develop the following skills:

    • Attention to detail
    • Critical thinking
    • Clear communications at work
    • Business ethics
    • Working together in teams
  • Intermediate Accounting III

    • Analyze methods used for revenue recognition.
    • Examine methods of accounting for income taxes including deferred taxes and net operating losses.
    • Differentiate accounting for pension funds and pension plans.
    • Analyze different types of lease transactions.
    • Examine methods to account for accounting errors and changes.
    • Analyze financial reporting disclosure requirements.

    Auditing

    • Determine the auditor’s responsibilities for adherence to professional, ethical, and legal standards.
    • Assess risk and audit evidence.
    • Determine internal controls to prevent and detect fraud.
    • Evaluate risks, internal control, and appropriate audit tests for asset, liability, and equity accounts.
    • Recommend appropriate audit reports for a completed audit.
    • Determine appropriate use of non-audit assurance or attestation services.

    Advanced Tax–Corporate

    • Examine the tax components and unique rules applicable to corporations.
    • Describe the corporate tax reporting process.
    • Analyze the tax treatment of business profits and distributions.
    • Prepare a C corporation and an S corporation income tax return.
    • Compare the allowed business entities and their related tax attributes.
    • Explain the IRS administrative powers and allowed taxpayer responses.

    Advanced Accounting

    • Apply the equity method of accounting for corporate investments.
    • Prepare worksheet consolidation entries for consolidated financial statements.
    • Determine the proper accounting for controlling and non-controlling interests in business combinations.
    • Assess the impact of variable interest entities, ownership patterns, and segment reporting.
    • Determine foreign currency business transactions and the translation of international corporate financial statements.
    • Evaluate accounting concepts for government and nonprofit entities and pension plans.
  • The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that employment of accountants and auditors will grow 10% from 2016 to 2026, which is faster than the average for all occupations.

NOTES AND CONDITIONS

Purdue Global cannot guarantee employment or career advancement. Certain accounting and finance positions may require further certification and/or licensing by individual states. This program was not designed to meet any specific state’s requirements for licensure or certification, and Purdue Global makes no representations or warranties as to whether the degree or any individual courses meet such requirements. Refer to the University Catalog for additional information.

To sit for the CPA Exam, states require students to have obtained 150 semester hours or 225 quarter credit hours. This program is 180 quarter credit hours (120 semester hours). To be eligible to sit for the CPA exam, a student who has completed Purdue Global’s Bachelor of Science in Accounting would need to complete the University's Master of Science in Accounting or its equivalent elsewhere. The University cannot guarantee students will be eligible to sit for or pass exams. This program was not designed to meet any specific state’s requirements for licensure or certification, and Purdue Global makes no representations or warranties as to whether the degree or any individual courses meet such requirements. Refer to the University Catalog for additional information. 

National long-term projections may not reflect local and/or short-term economic or job conditions, and do not guarantee actual job growth.